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  Study in New Zealand
 
>> Introduction
 
>> About New Zealand
 
>> Education System in New Zealand
 
>> Why New Zealand
 
>> Admission procedure
 
>> Visa Procedure
 
>> Financial Matters
 
>> Student life in New Zealand
 
>> Work Prospects in New Zealand
 
>> FAQs on New Zealand
   
   
 
 
 

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  Study in New Zealand:

 

 
  About the country:  
     
 

Capital

Wellington

Official Languages

English, Māori

Area (Total)

268,021 km2

Population (2012 estimate)

4,430,400

Currency

New Zealand dollar (NZD)

GDP-Per capita

$27,668

Time Difference

New Zealand Standard Time (NZST) – 6:30 hours plus IST

 International dialling code:

+64


New Zealand  is an island country located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses ‒ that of the North and South Islands which are separated by the Cook Strait and surrounded by numerous smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans.

History

It is estimated the Maori inhabited New Zealand around 800AD. Around eight hundred years later the Western world discovered New Zealand. New Zealand was first settled by Eastern Polynesians between 1250 and 1300, concluding a long series of voyages through the southern Pacific islands. In 1642, in a bid to locate the mysterious, rich land Australia, the Dutch Explorer, Abel Tasman caught sight of the West Coast of the South Island.

The First European to set foot on New Zealand soil was Captain James Cook of England, in 1769. He also made the first, but inaccurate map of the country.

Settlers from England started to arrive in the 1830's, and by 1840 a Treaty was signed between the crown and the chiefs of the Maori tribes. The Treaty of Waitangi handed sovereignty of New Zealand to the Crown, and is a matter of dispute even today, as the Maori translation is not quite the same as the English.

One hundred and seven years later, in 1947 New Zealand declared independence, and became its own country.

Geography

New Zealand is made up of two main islands and a number of smaller islands, located near the centre of the water hemisphere. The main North and South Islands are separated by the Cook Strait, 22 kilometres (14 mi) wide at its narrowest point. New Zealand is long (over 1,600 kilometres (990 mi) along its north-north-east axis) and narrow (a maximum width of 400 kilometres (250 mi)).


 Climate:

New Zealand is in the southern hemisphere, so January and February are the warmest months, autumn is from March to May, winter is from June to August, and spring runs from September to November.

New Zealand has a mild and temperate maritime climate with mean annual temperatures ranging from 10 °C (50 °F) in the south to 16 °C (61 °F) in the north.  Historical maxima and minima are 42.4 °C (108.3 °F) in Rangiora, Canterbury and −25.6 °C (−14.08 °F) in Ranfurly, Otago. Of the seven largest cities, Christchurch is the driest, receiving on average only 640 millimetres (25 in) of rain per year and Auckland the wettest, receiving almost twice that amount.

Economy

New Zealand has a modern, prosperous and developed market economy with an estimated gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita of roughly US$28,250. New Zealand was ranked 5th in the 2011 Human Development Index, 4th in the The Heritage Foundation's 2012 Index of Economic Freedom, and 13th in INSEAD's 2012 Global Innovation Index.

New Zealand is a country heavily dependent on free trade. Its principal export industries are agriculture, horticulture, fishing and forestry. These make up about half of the country's exports. Its major export partners are Australia, US, Japan, China, and UK. Tourism plays a significant role in New Zealand's economy.

Culture

While New Zealand is culturally and linguistically part of Polynesia, forming the south-western anchor of the Polynesian Triangle, much of contemporary New Zealand culture is derived from British roots. It also includes significant influences from American, Australian and Māori cultures, along with those of other European cultures and – more recently – non-Māori Polynesian and Asian cultures.

Celebration of Diwali and Chinese New Year are held in several of the larger cities. The world's largest Polynesian festival, Pasifika, is an annual event in Auckland.

Food

New Zealand cuisine is largely driven by local ingredients and seasonal variations. Occupying an Island nation with a primarily agricultural economy, New Zealanders enjoy quality local produce from land and sea. Similar to the cuisine of Australia, the cuisine of New Zealand is a diverse British-based cuisine with Mediterranean and Pacific Rim influences.

Historical influences came from Māori culture, and New American cuisine, Southeast Asian, East Asian and Indian traditions have become popular since the 1970s.



 
 
 
 
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